Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th Global Surgery and Transplantation Congress (715th Conference) Atlanta,Georgia, USA.

Day 1 :

  • Kidney Transplantation
Location: Atlanta
  • General surgery
Location: Atlanta
  • Islet and Pancreas Transplantation
Location: Atlanta
  • Liver Transplantation
Location: Atlanta

Session Introduction

Cosme Manzarbeitia

Crozer Chester Medical Center, USA

Title: Expanded and Marginal Donors in Liver Transplantation: Need, Use and Results
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Manzarbeitia, a Transplant and HPB surgeon earned his medical degree in 1982 from Universidad Autonoma de Madrid in Spain.  His post-doctoral training includes a surgical residency at North General Hospital (a Mount Sinai Medical Center training program), followed by an ASTS fellowship in multiorgan transplantation at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City.  He is certified by the American Board of Surgery.  Dr Manzarbeitia has been involved in 4 major Transplant Program startups in three states, where he has also gathered ample experience in Hepato Pancreato Biliary surgery.

Abstract:

The use of marginal donors has become very common, in liver transplantation. The increase in the number of patients waiting in the list makes it necessary to consider all possible organs for these recipients, since they have no alternative therapies. 
 
With the growth of this field, our practice has demonstrated that previous donor selection criteria were too restrictive. The creation of a Donor Risk Index has gone a long way towards standardizing criteria, but a large latitude remains in the spectrum of acceptable donors.  Clinical factors are still the main criteria for donor selection and can affect the outcome of transplantation. Major decision factors include some or all of the following: severe steatosis, long old or warm ischemia times, intractable sepsis, some viral infections and extra-CNS malignancy. Other contributing factors also include old age, mild-moderate steatosis, long ICU stay, altered liver function tests, hypernatremia, hypotension and pressors, moderately prolonged ischemia and sex mismatching.
 
As a consequence of increasing experience with use of marginal donors and a wider acceptance policy, an increasing number of usable livers without deleterious influences on graft and patients survival has been made available.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Cosme Manzarbeitia is a Transplant and HPB Surgeon, completed his Medical degree in 1982 from Universidad Autonoma de Madrid in Spain. His Post-doctoral training includes a Surgical Residency at North General Hospital (a Mount Sinai Medical Center training program), followed by an ASTS fellowship in Multi-organ Transplantation at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. He is certified by the American Board of Surgery. He has been involved in four major transplant program startups in three states, where he has also gathered ample experience in Hepato Pancreato Biliary Surgery.

Abstract:

The differential diagnosis of solid liver lesions is broad, but many can be diagnosed noninvasively. In some cases, predominantly solid liver lesions may have cystic components, as may be seen with hemangiomas or tumors that have areas that are necrotic. Conversely, predominantly cystic liver lesions may have solid areas, particularly in the setting of malignancy. This topic will review the differential diagnosis of solid and some cystic liver lesions, outline an approach to their evaluation, discuss the radiographic findings associated with common lesions and address the approach to malignant liver lesions and their management. Finally, directions in the management of metastatic liver disease are discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Sachin Daga has completed his Masters in general surgery at the age of 25 years from Nagpur University and postmasters studies from Nizam’s institute of medical sciences, Hyderabad, India. He is the senior consultant at primer 1000 bedded hospital (Krishna Institute of medical sciences) in Hyderabad. He has published few papers in reputed journals and has several talks in national and internation conferences and CME’s.

Abstract:

Infection occuring during early post operative period after liver transplantation result in significant rise in morbidity and mortality. Due to high immonusuppresive state immediately after liver transplant patients are prone for infections. During early period hospital acquired infection is most common cause of mortality after liver transplant. We have analysed our experence of 84 liver transplant performed during period of  june 2012 to feb 2016. 54.8% of patient suffered from one or more episode of bacterial and /or fungal sepsisdurig their post operative hospitalisation. The median onset of infection was on day 4 after transplantation. In our experience Klebsiella was seen  in 47.05%, acinetobacter – 29.41%, E coli 11.76%, Pseudomonas- 5.88%, and mucormycosis in 5.88%. Post operative infection was most ommon complication encounters after liver transplant. Among 84 Patients 46 developed infection. Out of 46 patient 14 died due to infection, off remaining two developed unusual infection. One developed gastric mucormycosis which was managed successfully with re=adical surgery. One patient developed malaria which improved with antimalarial.

 In present series overall 1 year mortality was 28.57%(24 out of 84). Infection was most common cause of mortality was seen in 58.3% (14 out of 84), followed by small for size 12.5% (3 out of 24 ), cental pontine mylinolysis 12.5% (3 out of 24 ), bleeding 8.3% (2 out of 24 ) and portal vein thrombosis in 4.2% (1 out of 24). 

  • Lung Transplantation
Location: Atlanta

Session Introduction

James D. Maloney

University of Wisconsin Hospital & Clinics, USA

Title: Single Lung Transplant in Moderate to Severe Pulmonary Hypertension
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. James D. Maloney completed his M.D. at the age of 26 years from Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. He went on to train at The University of Wisconsin and Wake Forest University in General and Thoracic Surgery, respectively. He is the Section Chief of Thoracic Surgery at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and on the Transplant Advisory Board for the Department of Veterans Affairs. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has served as a Member of the Transplant Network for the American College of Chest Physicians. The University of Wisconsin is ranked within the top 10 in overall transplant volume and has performed more than 675 lung transplants. 

Abstract:

Advanced lung disease (ALD) that requires lung transplantation (LTX) is frequently associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Whether the presence of PH significantly affects the outcomes following single-lung transplantation (SLT) remains controversial. Therefore, we retrospectively examined the outcomes of 279 consecutive SLT recipients transplanted at our center, and the patients were split into four groups based on their mean pulmonary artery pressure values. Outcomes, including long-term survival and primary graft dysfunction, did not differ significantly for patients with versus without PH, even when PH was severe. We suggest that SLT can be performed safely in patients with ALD-associated PH thereby increasing the impact of donors on the available organ pool.

Speaker
Biography:

Ahmed A. Abouarab is member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, has graduated from Cairo University School if Medicine in 2011 and started a residency in Cardiothoracic Surgery in 2012 at the Military Medical Complex at Maadi in Cairo, Egypt. In 2014, he started working as a clinical research fellow at the cardiothoracic surgery department at the university of Alabama at Birmingham. In 2015, he was certified as a general surgery specialist by the Egyptian Medical Syndicate, an ATLS® instructor by the American College of Surgeons, and by the ECFMG® | Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates.

Abstract:

This article is a continuation of previous reviews about the appropriate method for long-segment tracheal reconstruction. We attempted to cover the most recent, successful and promising results of the different solutions for reconstruction that are rather innovative and suitable for imminent clinical application. Latest efforts to minimize the limitations associated with each method have been covered as well. In summary, autologous and allogenic tissue reconstruction of the trachea have been successful methods for reconstruction experimentally and clinically. Autologous tissues were best utilized clinically to enhance revascularization, whether as a definitive airway or as an adjunct to allografts or tissue engineered trachea. Allogenic tissue transplantation are, currently, the most suitable for clinical application, especially after elimination of the need for immunosuppressive therapy with unlimited supply of tissues. Similar results have been reported in many studies that used tissue engineered trachea. However, clinical application of this method was limited to use as a salvage treatment in a few studies with promising results. These results still need to be solidified by further clinical and long term follow up reports. Combining different methods of reconstruction was often required to establish a physiological rather than an anatomical trachea and have shown superior outcomes.

  • Hair Transplantation
Location: Atlanta
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Ken Anderson, MD, ABFPRS, ABOTO is the only board certified facial plastic surgeon on Planet Earth who has dedicated his practice exclusively to the field of hair restoration surgery for over 13 years. He is the Founder and Chief Surgeon of the Anderson Center for Hair, which is home to Georgia’s first and only ARTAS® Robotic Hair Transplant system. The Anderson Center for Hair is dedicated to providing the most natural, permanent hair restoration results to both men and women, with an emphasis on artistic concepts, patient comfort, and natural, permanent results.

Abstract:

Millions of men and women suffer from hair loss.  Male- and female-pattern baldness can be a very stressful and debilitating condition. Nearly universally it negatively affects our self-image, and also negatively affects how others perceive us. Hair Restoration surgery is a surgical solution to hair loss, and one that has undergone a tremendous amount of change and refinement in just the last 15 years. The “pluggy” and “doll’s hair” appearance of hair restoration surgery patients is long gone, as it is now a follicle-by-follicle transplant. The resultant linear scarring on the back and sides of the scalp (e.g.: the donor area) is a telltale sign that a surgical hair restoration procedure has taken place, with all the associated social stigma.  A method of extracting hair from the donor area without using scalpels but instead with tiny circular punches was developed in the late 1990s.  This technique is called Follicular Unit Extraction (e.g.: FUE) and is a specialized form of hair restoration surgery that is growing in popularity around the world. This is a preferred surgical option for those who desire a hair restoration surgery but do not want the telltale linear scar on the scalp. I have been performing FUE surgery since 2003, and I will review my 13 year experience with the technique. An emphasis will be placed on surgical robotic technology, its advantages and limitations, and how it is transforming the patient experience, and enhancing cosmetic outcomes.

  • Transplantation Immunology and Immunogenetics
Location: Atlanta

Session Introduction

Shigeru Goto

Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan

Title: Mechanisms of rejection and tolerance from an aspect of autoimmunity
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Shigeru Goto has completed his PhD at the age of 34 years from Oita University and postdoctoral studies from Oita University Faculty Graduate School of Medicine, Oita, Japan. He is the visiting professot professor of Liver Transplantaion Program, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Kaohsiung Medical Center, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. He has published more than 100 180 papers in reputed journals.
 

Abstract:

Recent proteomic approach allows us to target on specific molecules underlying the common mechanism between experimental and clinical liver allograft tolerance. A novel insight has been gained since we found that post-transplant autoimmune responses with high titer of anti-nuclear antibodies against histone H1 and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) play an important role in the rejection and tolerance in both experimental and clinical settings. Our previous studies demonstarated that either treatment of recipient rats with commercially available anti-histone H1 polyclonal antibody (Ab) or immunization with calf thymus histone H1 could prolong allograft survival in heterotopic heart transplantation. We have also reported that the induction of autoimmune hepatitis during acute rejection could prolong the liver allograft survival of rats in an acute rejector liver-transplant model. Immunologically, the blockade of histone H1 modulated dendritic cells toward tolerogenic status, decreased the cytotoxicity of lymphokine activated killer and natural killer cells, and induced CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. For further analysis of this mechanism, we generated an immunosuppressive monoclonal Ab against histone H1 (16G9 mAb) and determined one peptide (designated SSV) that binds directly to 16G9 mAb. The binding of SSV to 16G9 mAb or serum of both tolerogeneic OLT rats and clinical drug-free OLT patients, was inhibited by histone H1. Furthermore, SSV mAb or  immunization of mice with SSV induced immunosuppression in serum,suggesting that SSV was an epitope responsible for the immunosuppressive activity of 16G9 mAb. SSV mAb and peptide SSV will allow us to establish a novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategy in transplantation. This presenation reviews our work exploring how the autoimmune response against nuclear proteins is involved in transplantation immunology.

  • Stem Cell Transplantation
Location: Atlanta